I have one very simple mission. I want to show people music. Music they've never heard before. I know how much music means to me and I know that I am always looking for new music that I love. I created this blog in the hopes that perhaps I could help other people discover new music as easily as they possibly can. There are few things I love more than learning that I've helped someone discover music, and I love discussing music even more. If I have helped you discover something, feel free to let me know, I'd love to hear about it. And most importantly, if you read these reviews and, somehow, enjoy them, thank you.

If you would like to submit music to me to review, message me with a link to your music and I will review it. Please only send me music that is from the current year, as I prefer to stick to one year.







"Music is a higher revelation than all wisdom and philosophy. It is the electric soil in which the soul lives, thinks and invents."
-Ludwig Van Beethoven

 

"Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes" - Thom Yorke
4/5. If you had asked me what a new Thom Yorke solo album would sound like, it would virtually have been this album. If you’re familiar with Yorke’s first solo album, “The Eraser”, then you know what this album sounds like, also if you’ve heard what might as well have been another Yorke solo album, Atoms For Peace’s “Amok”, then you’re familiar with what this album sounds like. It’s Yorke experimenting with various electronic sounds while he wails in his trademark falsetto voice, all produced by longtime Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich. It goes without saying to not expect this to be Radiohead, it’s all Thom Yorke, and it’s pretty solid. It gets a little self-indulgent at times, but it’s still good enough to keep your interest, it’s worth checking out.

"Tomorrow’s Modern Boxes" - Thom Yorke

4/5. If you had asked me what a new Thom Yorke solo album would sound like, it would virtually have been this album. If you’re familiar with Yorke’s first solo album, “The Eraser”, then you know what this album sounds like, also if you’ve heard what might as well have been another Yorke solo album, Atoms For Peace’s “Amok”, then you’re familiar with what this album sounds like. It’s Yorke experimenting with various electronic sounds while he wails in his trademark falsetto voice, all produced by longtime Radiohead producer Nigel Godrich. It goes without saying to not expect this to be Radiohead, it’s all Thom Yorke, and it’s pretty solid. It gets a little self-indulgent at times, but it’s still good enough to keep your interest, it’s worth checking out.

"Tyranny" - Julian Casablancas + The Voidz
4.5/5. This is not what you think it is. You may know Julian Casablancas as the lead singer of The Strokes, and as the lead singer of a garage rock band (what some may describe as a fairly simple genre), one would not necessarily expect much more from him than the straight guitar/drums/bass/singing formula that The Strokes have done so well with the past decade or so. You may or may not have hear Casablancas’ solo album from a few years back, “Phrazes For The Young”, which was pretty different, especially for him. This album is closer to Phrazes than it is to any Strokes album. It’s somewhere in between, leaning more towards Casablancas’ experimental side. This is Casablancas showing something he’s not shown before, a different side to his music, a more complex side. The album is a wall of noise, but it’s not senseless, it’s composed well, and Casablancas’ vocals are solid, as is the instrumentation. It’s a pretty awesome album, different than what I expected. Just don’t go in expecting a Strokes album. Highlights include: “Human Sadness”, “Nintendo Blood” and “Where No Eagles Fly”.

"Tyranny" - Julian Casablancas + The Voidz

4.5/5. This is not what you think it is. You may know Julian Casablancas as the lead singer of The Strokes, and as the lead singer of a garage rock band (what some may describe as a fairly simple genre), one would not necessarily expect much more from him than the straight guitar/drums/bass/singing formula that The Strokes have done so well with the past decade or so. You may or may not have hear Casablancas’ solo album from a few years back, “Phrazes For The Young”, which was pretty different, especially for him. This album is closer to Phrazes than it is to any Strokes album. It’s somewhere in between, leaning more towards Casablancas’ experimental side. This is Casablancas showing something he’s not shown before, a different side to his music, a more complex side. The album is a wall of noise, but it’s not senseless, it’s composed well, and Casablancas’ vocals are solid, as is the instrumentation. It’s a pretty awesome album, different than what I expected. Just don’t go in expecting a Strokes album. Highlights include: “Human Sadness”, “Nintendo Blood” and “Where No Eagles Fly”.

"Too Bright" - Perfume Genius
5/5. Perhaps one of the greatest things about music is its ability to showcase the intimate portions of the human experience without sounding invasive. People have an obsession with watching other people, an obsession with voyeurism (to a point), seeing what other people do in what are typically private situations. It’s evident in our movies, our TV shows and our music (Laura Mulvey has written extensively on this subject). But the beautiful thing about music is it exists as a catharsis, it exists for the purpose of being an outlet for the creator as well as the listener. A musician writes about the emotions they are experiencing or the situation they’re in and people listen to it and say “I was/am in the same spot, and I understand”. Mike Hadreas (aka Perfume Genius) puts himself on full display for everyone on this album. This album is intimate, like reading someone’s diary, yet it is also triumphant in a way. This album is about dealing with things, dealing with unpleasant things that happen to you, looking them in the eye and refusing to be taken down by them. Whether Hadreas is slowly singing in a voice just above a whisper over a sparse set of instrumentation (typically just a reverbed piano) or singing something more layered and instrumentally involved, you feel a connection to him. The beauty in this album cannot be overstated, it’s powerful, emotionally evocative stuff. Highlights include: “Fool”, “Queen” and “I’m A Mother”.

"Too Bright" - Perfume Genius

5/5. Perhaps one of the greatest things about music is its ability to showcase the intimate portions of the human experience without sounding invasive. People have an obsession with watching other people, an obsession with voyeurism (to a point), seeing what other people do in what are typically private situations. It’s evident in our movies, our TV shows and our music (Laura Mulvey has written extensively on this subject). But the beautiful thing about music is it exists as a catharsis, it exists for the purpose of being an outlet for the creator as well as the listener. A musician writes about the emotions they are experiencing or the situation they’re in and people listen to it and say “I was/am in the same spot, and I understand”. Mike Hadreas (aka Perfume Genius) puts himself on full display for everyone on this album. This album is intimate, like reading someone’s diary, yet it is also triumphant in a way. This album is about dealing with things, dealing with unpleasant things that happen to you, looking them in the eye and refusing to be taken down by them. Whether Hadreas is slowly singing in a voice just above a whisper over a sparse set of instrumentation (typically just a reverbed piano) or singing something more layered and instrumentally involved, you feel a connection to him. The beauty in this album cannot be overstated, it’s powerful, emotionally evocative stuff. Highlights include: “Fool”, “Queen” and “I’m A Mother”.

"Mitau" - Audrey Fall
4/5. I would say that this album’s cover suits the music very well. This is a post-rock album, and post-rock is all about huge crescendos, big walls of sound, loud guitars and sweeping melodies, and when this album does get big, it gets mountainous. The only downfall to this album is that it’s pretty standard post-rock fare, there’s nothing different or unique about this album to differentiate it from the multitude of other post-rock bands out there. However, that does not necessarily mean that this is a bad album, it’s still a solid album and an enjoyable listen, it could just use something different to make it stand out. Regardless though, if you’re a fan of post-rock, you’ll likely enjoy this album.

"Mitau" - Audrey Fall

4/5. I would say that this album’s cover suits the music very well. This is a post-rock album, and post-rock is all about huge crescendos, big walls of sound, loud guitars and sweeping melodies, and when this album does get big, it gets mountainous. The only downfall to this album is that it’s pretty standard post-rock fare, there’s nothing different or unique about this album to differentiate it from the multitude of other post-rock bands out there. However, that does not necessarily mean that this is a bad album, it’s still a solid album and an enjoyable listen, it could just use something different to make it stand out. Regardless though, if you’re a fan of post-rock, you’ll likely enjoy this album.

"Bloodwork" - Texas In July
3.5/5. Texas In July has undergone a pretty serious lineup change. When you’re a metal band and you lose both your vocalist and lead guitarist, your band takes a pretty big hit. But good for Texas In July, as they recover from that pretty decently with this album. There are some really cool moments, the guitar work from new guitarist Cam Welsh is pretty solid, the instrumentation in general is pretty good, however too much of the album is very middle-of-the-road metalcore, relatively standard stuff. In essence, this is a mediocre album with some nice moments to it. I do give TIJ credit though, they recovered from a pretty big hit fairly well.

"Bloodwork" - Texas In July

3.5/5. Texas In July has undergone a pretty serious lineup change. When you’re a metal band and you lose both your vocalist and lead guitarist, your band takes a pretty big hit. But good for Texas In July, as they recover from that pretty decently with this album. There are some really cool moments, the guitar work from new guitarist Cam Welsh is pretty solid, the instrumentation in general is pretty good, however too much of the album is very middle-of-the-road metalcore, relatively standard stuff. In essence, this is a mediocre album with some nice moments to it. I do give TIJ credit though, they recovered from a pretty big hit fairly well.

"Dude Incredible" - Shellac
4.5/5. Shellac is weird. But they’re weird in an awesome kind of way, in the way that strikes you, you listen to them and go “What am I listening to? This is kind of fantastic.” This is Shellac’s first album in seven years, they’ve been around since the 90s making what they call “minimalist rock”, which is actually a pretty apt description of what they do. This album is a prime example of Shellac’s “minimalist rock”, it’s all pretty simple. Guitar, drums, bass, vocals, and while many bands would use that to create a loud and full sound, Shellac uses it to create a minimal, empty-room kind of sound. This is an album that makes you pay attention, whether you like it or not. If it isn’t the cool riffs or the excellent guitar work, it’s Steve Albini. It’s his lyrics, it’s his singing, it’s his screaming, it’s his cawing like a bird, Albini won’t let you pay attention to anything else. And why would you? This album is worth paying close attention to.

"Dude Incredible" - Shellac

4.5/5. Shellac is weird. But they’re weird in an awesome kind of way, in the way that strikes you, you listen to them and go “What am I listening to? This is kind of fantastic.” This is Shellac’s first album in seven years, they’ve been around since the 90s making what they call “minimalist rock”, which is actually a pretty apt description of what they do. This album is a prime example of Shellac’s “minimalist rock”, it’s all pretty simple. Guitar, drums, bass, vocals, and while many bands would use that to create a loud and full sound, Shellac uses it to create a minimal, empty-room kind of sound. This is an album that makes you pay attention, whether you like it or not. If it isn’t the cool riffs or the excellent guitar work, it’s Steve Albini. It’s his lyrics, it’s his singing, it’s his screaming, it’s his cawing like a bird, Albini won’t let you pay attention to anything else. And why would you? This album is worth paying close attention to.

"Primitive And Deadly" - Earth
4.5/5. If there’s one thing you can say about Earth, it’s that they’re meticulous. Everything in its right place, everything is put somewhere for a reason. Earth has changed quite a bit in the time they’ve been around, from drone music now to stoner rock, but throughout they maintain a plodding heaviness and a sense of definite purpose. This is the first Earth album in a long time to feature vocals, and the vocals add a whole other element to Earth’s music. But even so, the vocals are not the focus of this album, it’s the instrumentation, which is fantastic. The guitars are thick, powerful, and expertly arranged, everything fits together like a thousand-piece jigsaw puzzle that, when put together properly, reveals a intricate work of art. It’s impressive stuff, a new page for Earth as a band, and it’s going to be cool to see where they go from here.

"Primitive And Deadly" - Earth

4.5/5. If there’s one thing you can say about Earth, it’s that they’re meticulous. Everything in its right place, everything is put somewhere for a reason. Earth has changed quite a bit in the time they’ve been around, from drone music now to stoner rock, but throughout they maintain a plodding heaviness and a sense of definite purpose. This is the first Earth album in a long time to feature vocals, and the vocals add a whole other element to Earth’s music. But even so, the vocals are not the focus of this album, it’s the instrumentation, which is fantastic. The guitars are thick, powerful, and expertly arranged, everything fits together like a thousand-piece jigsaw puzzle that, when put together properly, reveals a intricate work of art. It’s impressive stuff, a new page for Earth as a band, and it’s going to be cool to see where they go from here.

"Plowing Into The Field Of Love" - Iceage
4/5. To me, Iceage has always sounded like a band that’s just about to fall apart, that’s teetering on the edge of a cliff, but never falls. They’re all about controlled chaos, which they do pretty well. This band always sounds like things are about to collapse, but they never do. They’re punk, but not nearly as straightforward as some punk is. The instrumentation I think is what’s most interesting, there’s a good variety, it’s not what you would typically hear from punk music, there’s piano, violins, a lot of things, not just loud, aggressive guitars. At the very least, Iceage is interesting. Sometimes the music drags a little, but generally, Iceage is interesting to listen to, it’s cool to pick apart what’s going on. This album I would say is easily as good as their last one, a solid album that’s worth giving a listen.

"Plowing Into The Field Of Love" - Iceage

4/5. To me, Iceage has always sounded like a band that’s just about to fall apart, that’s teetering on the edge of a cliff, but never falls. They’re all about controlled chaos, which they do pretty well. This band always sounds like things are about to collapse, but they never do. They’re punk, but not nearly as straightforward as some punk is. The instrumentation I think is what’s most interesting, there’s a good variety, it’s not what you would typically hear from punk music, there’s piano, violins, a lot of things, not just loud, aggressive guitars. At the very least, Iceage is interesting. Sometimes the music drags a little, but generally, Iceage is interesting to listen to, it’s cool to pick apart what’s going on. This album I would say is easily as good as their last one, a solid album that’s worth giving a listen.

"World On Fire" - Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators
3/5. I love Slash, he’s easily one of my favorite guitar players of all time. I love Myles Kennedy too (of Altar Bridge), the man has an awesome voice, equal parts beautiful and powerful. So naturally, one would think that I would then like this album right? Unfortunately, that just isn’t the case. This album is basically a rehashing of their last album together, “Apocalyptic Love”. The two albums sound virtually the same, if you played both on shuffle between each other, I doubt you could tell one from the other. The songs just feel generic, they’re uninteresting for the most part, I mean, Slash’s guitar work is good, Kennedy’s vocals are solid, but the whole album just elicited a big, resounding “meh” from me. I mean, it’s not bad, it’s fine, it’s just not particularly interesting.

"World On Fire" - Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy & The Conspirators

3/5. I love Slash, he’s easily one of my favorite guitar players of all time. I love Myles Kennedy too (of Altar Bridge), the man has an awesome voice, equal parts beautiful and powerful. So naturally, one would think that I would then like this album right? Unfortunately, that just isn’t the case. This album is basically a rehashing of their last album together, “Apocalyptic Love”. The two albums sound virtually the same, if you played both on shuffle between each other, I doubt you could tell one from the other. The songs just feel generic, they’re uninteresting for the most part, I mean, Slash’s guitar work is good, Kennedy’s vocals are solid, but the whole album just elicited a big, resounding “meh” from me. I mean, it’s not bad, it’s fine, it’s just not particularly interesting.

"Time To Die" - Electric Wizard
4.5/5. Electric Wizard have a reputation for being one of the heavier metal bands out there. Specifically, Electric Wizard subscribe to the genre of doom metal, heavy, loud, plodding metal that sounds like a heavier version of Black Sabbath. On this album, Electric Wizard executes doom metal with near-perfection, which should come as no surprise being that this is the band that released “Dopethrone”. The riffs are thick, they’re powerful, the guitar-work is excellent and overall, this is one dark album. I almost get a sense that Electric Wizard is attempting to make a statement about the overreaction to the genre of metal that people seem to have. There’s multiple references, mostly through spoken word, to how heavy metal is related to satanism and how the culture of metal breeds violence and death. I get the impression that, with this album, Electric Wizard is trying to point out the ridiculousness of that notion, or at the very least, making the listener think about it. It’s a fantastic album, a big, powerful album and absolutely worth checking out.

"Time To Die" - Electric Wizard

4.5/5. Electric Wizard have a reputation for being one of the heavier metal bands out there. Specifically, Electric Wizard subscribe to the genre of doom metal, heavy, loud, plodding metal that sounds like a heavier version of Black Sabbath. On this album, Electric Wizard executes doom metal with near-perfection, which should come as no surprise being that this is the band that released “Dopethrone”. The riffs are thick, they’re powerful, the guitar-work is excellent and overall, this is one dark album. I almost get a sense that Electric Wizard is attempting to make a statement about the overreaction to the genre of metal that people seem to have. There’s multiple references, mostly through spoken word, to how heavy metal is related to satanism and how the culture of metal breeds violence and death. I get the impression that, with this album, Electric Wizard is trying to point out the ridiculousness of that notion, or at the very least, making the listener think about it. It’s a fantastic album, a big, powerful album and absolutely worth checking out.